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Best cities to search for an employment in Nigeria

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Unemployment is one of the major challenges in Nigeria. Graduate youths increase at Geometric progression annually while job opportunities increase at Arithmetic progression. Thus making the labor very competitive and challenging. However, this article attempt to present to our readers the best cities to look for jobs in Nigeria.

 

Although unemployment is rampart in the country, but some cities have more employment opportunities than others. So, We sincerely hope that you will leave your village to one of these cities after reading this article.

 

It is actually very funny how some graduates will finish Youth Service and go back to the village to sit down. They will end up giving their resume to their uncles that retired from NNPC ten years ago.

 

These same people will end up saying I graduated 4 years ago, there is no job. Ask him how many jobs he has applied for. You will hear, I gave my uncle CV and he refuse to help me. The first step to getting a job in Nigeria is to leave your comfort zone.

 

What Are The Best Cities To Look For Jobs In Nigeria?

 

1-Lagos

 

One of the best cities to look for jobs in Nigeria is Lagos. It is the busiest and most industrialized city in West Africa. There are several employment opportunities for job seekers in Lagos.

 

As a matter of fact, most of the top notch companies in the world have offices in Lagos. You will always find a job in Lagos, even if the pay is very small. This is why it is rated the best place to look for job in Nigeria.

 

2-Ibadan

 

Ibadan is another great city to look for jobs in Nigeria. There are several large and small manufacturing companies in the city.

 

Also, there are construction and mining companies in Ibadan. These companies provide several job opportunities to Nigerians every year.

 

3-Port Harcourt

 

Port Harcourt is the capital and largest city in River State. It is great place to look for job. However, there are more opportunities for engineer in this city than any other professions.

 

Most of the opportunities in Port Harcourt are oil and gas related and they are high paying job. In fact, if you get a job as a graduate in any of the oil and gas companies there, it is a good way to kiss poverty good bye.

 

Companies like Shell, Mobil, Schlumberger, Total, Intel etc are some of the top notch companies in Port Harcourt.

 

4-Abuja

 

Abuja is the capital city of Nigeria. The head quarters of most Federal Government organizations are in Abuja. So, it is the best location to look for Federal government Job.

 

Also, there are private firms and construction companies that pay very well in Abuja. These different firms provide series of opportunities to young Nigeria graduate.

 

5-Kano

 

Kano is another juicy location to look for job in Nigeria. There are several manufacturing companies in Kano ranging from Plastic, Foam, Rubber, Aluminum, Noodles etc. All these companies provide opportunities for job seekers.

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Atiku vs Buhari: Tribunal Fixes Date For Final Judgement

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The presidential election tribunal is reportedly set to deliver the final judgement on September 15

PDP’s Atiku had on March 18, 2019 filed a petition challenging the victory of President Buhari of the APC in the 2019 general elections – Section 134 (1) to (3) of the Electoral Act provides that an election petition should be filed, heard and determined within 180 days The presidential election petitions tribunal is reportedly set to deliver judgement not later than 13th of September, 2019.

Leadership newspaper, quoting an anonymous source, reports that the initial date of September 15 set by the tribunal is no longer realistic because it is a Sunday.

The source claimed that the judgement will be delivered on September 13. “The petition of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) presidential candidate in the February 23 presidential election, Alhaji Atiku Abubakar, and his party, will definitely be decided before September 15.

’They (the tribunal) cannot go beyond that date in deciding the petition one way or the other because by law, that is how far they can go in the case. They can’t sit beyond that day. They are not permitted to do so by law. The 180 days stipulated by the law will elapse that day,’’ according to the source.

Section 134 (1) to (3) of the Electoral Act provides that an election petition should be filed, heard and determined within 180 days. Atiku had on March 18, 2019, filed a petition at the tribunal claiming that he and his party defeated President Muhammadu Buhari, the candidate of the All Progressives Congress (APC), who was declared the winner of the election by the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC).

The tribunal, headed by Justice Mohammed Garba, which began its inaugural sitting on May 7, reserved the petition for judgement on August 21 after hearing the arguments of the parties before it

The PDP presidential candidate said that the election was marred by irregularities, adding that the president was not qualified and shouldn’t have been allowed to contest the election.

Atiku in his final address insisted that President Buhari lied on oath in his form CF001 which he presented to INEC before standing for the contest. In the final address presented on his behalf by his lead counsel, Dr Levy Uzuokwu (SAN), Atiku drew the attention of the tribunal to a portion of Buhari’s form with INEC where he claimed to have three different certificates comprising primary school leaving certificate, the West African Examination Council (WAEC) certificate and Officer Cadet’s certificate.

Atiku, therefore, urged the tribunal to nullify the participation of Buhari in the election on the grounds that he lied on oath to deceive Nigerians and to secure unlawful qualification for the election. The PDP presidential candidate also faulted the claim by INEC that it had no central server, adding that a server is a storage facility including computers where database of registered voters, number of permanent voter cards and election results amongst others are stored for references.

He, therefore, urged the tribunal to uphold the petition and nullify the participation of Buhari in the election on the ground that he was not qualified to have stood for the election, in addition to malpractices that prompted his declaration as the winner. But, INEC represented by Yunus Usman (SAN) urged the tribunal to dismiss the petition with substantial cost because the electoral body conducted the election in total compliance with the Nigerian constitution and Electoral Act 2010.

Usman insisted that INEC did not transmit election results electronically because doing so was prohibited by law and that the commission did not call any witness because there was no need to do so. INEC further explained that there was no way Atiku could have won the election, adding that he was not declared winner of the exercise because it was satisfied that the PDP candidate did not secure majority of lawful votes during the election.

In his defence, President Buhari through his legal team argued that Atiku’s petition was liable to be dismissed because it was lacking in evidence, merit and substance and that the petition is ill-advised and signified Nothing

He cited Section 131 of the constitution which stipulates a minimum of secondary school attendance to qualify for the election in Nigeria, adding that he cannot go beyond that and that he does not need to tender or attached certificates before he can get qualification for any election.

The APC represented by Prince Lateef Fagbemi (SAN) in its submission said that the petition lacked quality evidence that could warrant the nullification of the election as pleaded by the petitioners and urged the tribunal to dismiss the petition.

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Nigeria’s Economy Slipping – World Bank

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The World Bank has said that the Nigerian economy has been slipping since 1995 and this continued till 2018.

 

The bank, in its latest report on the regional economy titled, ‘Africa’s Pulse’, released the taxonomy of growth performance in sub-Saharan Africa, which focused on the macroeconomic and financial features that led to growth resilience on the continent.

 

 

 

According to the bank, the taxonomy is used to help identify the factors that are correlated with success or failure in economic growth performance in sub-Saharan Africa, with emphasis on macroeconomic and financial variables.

 

The analysis, it said, involved a series of macroeconomic variables for 44 sub-Saharan African countries from 1995 to 2018.

 

The key elements that determined the positions of each of the 44 sub-Saharan economies in the taxonomy, the World Bank said, included the level of income per capita of the countries; structural transformation, as captured by sectoral value-added share and sectoral employment share; and capital flows.

 

Others are level and composition of public sector indebtedness, as captured by the general government gross debt and its currency composition, and the outstanding external public debt.

 

The last of the indicators has to do with governance vis-a-vis government effectiveness, regulatory quality, control of corruption, voice and accountability, political stability, and absence of violence and rule of law.

 

According to the World Bank, the taxonomy compares the average annual GDP growth rates during 1995–2008 and 2015–2018 against predetermined thresholds.

 

 

 

It also categorised growth performance into five groups: falling behind, slipping, stuck in the middle, improved, and established. The five groups were further reclassified into three groups: Top tercile, middle tercile and bottom tercile.

 

 

 

The Bretton Wood institution said, “If a country’s economic performance declined from 1995–2008 to 2015–18, the country is categorised in the bottom tercile, which includes ‘falling behind’ and ‘slipping.’ If a country’s growth rate remained invariant over time, between 3.5 and 5.4 per cent in both periods, it is categorised in the middle tercile (or stuck in the middle). If a country’s economic performance improved from 1995–2008 to 2015–18, with the growth of more than 5.4 per cent per year, the country is categorised in the top tercile, which includes the ‘improved’ and ‘established’ groups.”

 

Based on the above classification, the Nigerian economy was categorised alongside 18 other sub-Saharan African economies as slipping having recorded declined economic performance between 1995 and 2018.

The key elements that determined the positions of each of the 44 sub-Saharan economies in the taxonomy, the World Bank said, included the level of income per capita of the countries; structural transformation, as captured by sectoral value-added share and sectoral employment share; and capital flows.

 

Others are level and composition of public sector indebtedness, as captured by the general government gross debt and its currency composition, and the outstanding external public debt.

 

The last of the indicators has to do with governance vis-a-vis government effectiveness, regulatory quality, control of corruption, voice and accountability, political stability, and absence of violence and rule of law.

 

According to the World Bank, the taxonomy compares the average annual GDP growth rates during 1995–2008 and 2015–2018 against predetermined thresholds.

 

 

It also categorised growth performance into five groups: falling behind, slipping, stuck in the middle, improved, and established. The five groups were further reclassified into three groups: Top tercile, middle tercile and bottom tercile.

 

 

 

The Bretton Wood institution said, “If a country’s economic performance declined from 1995–2008 to 2015–18, the country is categorised in the bottom tercile, which includes ‘falling behind’ and ‘slipping.’ If a country’s growth rate remained invariant over time, between 3.5 and 5.4 per cent in both periods, it is categorised in the middle tercile (or stuck in the middle). If a country’s economic performance improved from 1995–2008 to 2015–18, with the growth of more than 5.4 per cent per year, the country is categorised in the top tercile, which includes the ‘improved’ and ‘established’ groups.”

 

Based on the above classification, the Nigerian economy was categorised alongside 18 other sub-Saharan African economies as slipping having recorded declined economic performance between 1995 and 2018.

 

The World Bank said, “The bottom tercile consists of 19 countries: Angola, Burundi, Botswana, the Republic of Congo, the Comoros , Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Liberia, Lesotho, Mauritania, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Eswatini, Chad, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.  These countries did not show any progress in their economic performance from 1995–2008 to 2015–18. For instance, their median economic growth rate decelerated, from 5.4 per cent per year in 1995–2008 to 1.2 per cent per year in 2015–18.”

 

 

 

The bottom performing economies, according to the World Bank, produce almost 60 per cent of the region’s total GDP, emphasising that the three largest countries in the region—Nigeria, South Africa, and Angola—and many commodity exporters are in this group.

 

Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Mali, Rwanda, Senegal, and Tanzania made the top tercile.

 

The middle tercile countries are Benin, the Central African Republic, Cameroon, the

 

Democratic Republic of Congo, Cabo Verde, The Gambia, Madagascar, Mozambique, Mauritius, Niger, Sudan, São Tomé and Príncipe, Togo, and Uganda.

 

The World Bank also cut its growth forecast for sub-Saharan Africa this year to 2.8 per cent from an initial 3.3 per cent.

 

The commodity price slump of 2015 cut short a decade of rapid growth for the region, and the bank said growth would take longer to recover as a decline in industrial production and a trade dispute between China and the United States take their toll.

 

The bank’s 2019 forecast means economic growth will lag population growth for the fourth year in a row and it will remain stuck below three per cent, which it slipped to in 2015.

 

“The slower-than-expected overall growth reflects ongoing global uncertainty, but increasingly comes from domestic macroeconomic instability including poorly managed debt, inflation and deficits,” the bank said.

 

The Bretton Wood institution equally cut Nigeria’s growth forecast by 0.1 pecent

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OPINION: Dear Men, What Attracts You To A Woman?

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As humans, we yearn for different things while our desires vary based on taste and preferences.

 

It is that same variation in desire that makes different men get attracted to different types of women.

 

For many, it is physical attributes like height, skin colour, body size and other features while sapiosexuals are largely drawn to intelligence.

 

Some, on the other hand, are drawn to qualities like character, behaviour and attitude.

 

What works for you?

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